Healthy Living Information, tips and tricks
Latest Stories
 
 
 

Types of Color Blindness

Color blindness is kind of eyes disease which usually affects a person’s ability to distinguish between shades of red and green or between shades of blue and yellow. Complete color blindness, which is very rare, causes a person to see most objects in shades of gray.

Usually people with this disease got by inherited. Though, it has variety which divided into 3:  Monochromacy, Dichromacy, and Anomalous trichromacy.

# Monochromachy

* Rod monochromacy
frequently called achromatopsia, where the retina contains no cone cells, so that in addition to the absence of color discrimination, vision in lights of normal intensity is difficult.

*Cone monochromacy
It is the condition of having both rods and cones, but only a single kind of cone. A cone monochromat can have good pattern vision at normal daylight levels, but will not be able to distinguish hues

# Dichromacy

*Protanopia
Lacking the long-wavelength sensitive retinal cones, those with this condition are unable to distinguish between colors in the green–yellow–red section of the spectrum. They have a neutral point at a greenish wavelength around 492 nm – that is, they cannot discriminate light of this wavelength from white. For the protanope, the brightness of red, orange, and yellow are much reduced compared to normal. This dimming can be so pronounced that reds may be confused with black or dark gray, and red traffic lights may appear to be extinguished.

*Deuteranopia
Lacking the medium-wavelength cones, those affected are again unable to distinguish between colors in the green–yellow–red section of the spectrum. Their neutral point is at a slightly longer wavelength, 498 nm. The deuteranope suffers the same hue discrimination problems as the protanope, but without the abnormal dimming.

*Tritanopia
Lacking the short-wavelength cones, those affected are unable to distinguish colors along the blue–yellow dimension. This form of color blindness is not sex-linked.

#Anomalus trichromacy

*Protanomaly
Having a mutated form of the long-wavelength (red) pigment, whose peak sensitivity is at a shorter wavelength than in the normal retina, protanomalous individuals are less sensitive to red light than normal. This means that they are less able to discriminate colors, and they do not see mixed lights as having the same colors as normal observers.

*Deuteranomaly
Having a mutated form of the medium-wavelength (green) pigment. The medium-wavelength pigment is shifted towards the red end of the spectrum resulting in a reduction in sensitivity to the green area of the spectrum. Unlike protanomaly the intensity of colors is unchanged. This is the most common form of color blindness, making up about 6% of the male population. The deuteranomalous person is considered “green weak”.

*Tritanomaly
Having a mutated form of the short-wavelength (blue) pigment. The short-wavelength pigment is shifted towards the green area of the spectrum.

 

Check the following links:

How To Prevent

Color Blindness Treatment

What Causes Color Blindness

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

 
Comments: 0 Comments

Leave a Reply

 
 
 
HealthLob.com © 2016. All Rights Reserved.